Reformed Forum

Joel Fick shows us how important it is to bring various passages of Scripture to bear upon one another, particularly where one may fill in the gap for the other. In Exodus 2 we learn how Christ is not a picture of Moses, but rather Moses is a picture of Christ.

Direct download: pc084.mp3
Category:Proclaiming Christ -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob wanted to pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man with a consideration of the preaching ministry of Enoch and how that ministry relates to the the kingdom of God. However, we were sidetracked more than once to talk about the current COVID-19 pandemic, our response to it...yeah, lot's of rabbit trails.

Direct download: tsp195.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 7:45am EDT

After having created Adam in his image and placing him in the Garden of Eden, God entered into a covenant with him (Gen. 2:16–17). In Westminster Confession of Faith 7.1, the divines wrote,

The distance between God and the creature is so great, that although reasonable creatures do owe obedience unto him as their Creator, yet they could never have any fruition of him as their blessedness and reward, but by some voluntary condescension on God's part, which he hath been pleased to express by way of covenant.

There are several important things to note in this passage. First, upon creation and prior to the establishment of the covenant, Adam already knew God and owed him obedience merely from the fact that he was created in God's image. God did not owe Adam anything, and Adam could in no way place God into his debt. Second, the type of fruition that the covenant affords is that of God as "blessedness and reward." Adam already owed God personal, perfect, exact and entire obedience, though God voluntarily condescended to establish the covenant of works by which Adam could consummately come to know God in glory. In other words, he could ascend God's holy hill (Psalm 24) through the gratuitous means God provided.

Westminster Confession of Faith 7.1 is not describing covenant as the means by which God ontologically or metaphysically condescends to creation. God does not assume new properties, attributes, or characteristics to do so. Neither does the confession speak of the covenant as the means by which Adam comes to know God generally—as if Adam would not even know that God existed apart from a covenant. The covenant is the means by which he may come to know God specifically as his blessedness and reward.

https://vimeo.com/410742856

Direct download: ctc643.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Mark Winder shows us how in the story of Isaac which parallels that of Abraham, there is a theological point being made: from a human perspective there is one crisis after another. But from the divine perspective, there is no salvation outside of God. Only his hand will triumph. We will also see how Abraham's obedience is a type of the obedience of Christ.

Direct download: pc083.mp3
Category:Proclaiming Christ -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode, we continue our discussion of Justin Martyr's account of ancient Christian worship, focusing this time on the Lord's Supper (eucharist) and Lord's Day worship.

Justin Martyr wrote an early account of ancient Christian worship. It was written by a believer for an unbeliever. He does not assume that his intended reader—the Emperor Antoninus Pius (138–161)—knows anything about Christian worship. Second, while Pliny describes the worship practices of the Christians in Pontus, Justin describes the liturgical customs of the church in Rome. Justin lived and worshiped in Rome, but he didn’t convert in Rome. He most likely converted to Christianity in Ephesus around 130 A.D. So he was familiar with the liturgical customs of both Western and Eastern Christians. Third, Justin’s account is descriptive not prescriptive. It’s not a church order (e.g. Didache, Apostolic Tradition). It is simply a description of what Christians were already doing not what Justin thought they ought to do.

https://vimeo.com/408626530

Direct download: ctc642.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In Episode 82, Jim Cassidy gives us a primer on Covenant Theology. As Israel, shaped by the law, becomes an analogy of Adam as Adam is in covenant with God in the garden, a pattern is seen between Adam and Israel. If Adam disobeys, he is exiled from the Garden, as is also the case with Israel. God, however, is the covenant keeper, providing redemption for his people in doing what they are unable to do.

Direct download: pc082.mp3
Category:Proclaiming Christ -- posted at: 11:41am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man with a consideration of the kingdom, man, and creation.

Direct download: tsp194.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 11:38am EDT

In his first apology (ca. 150–155 A.D.), Justin Martyr wrote an early account of ancient Christian worship, describing ancient practices regarding the sacraments and Lord's Day worship. It was written to an unbeliever, and therefore Justin does not assume that his intended reader—the Emperor Antoninus Pius (138–161)—knows anything about Christian worship. Moreover, while Pliny describes the worship practices of the Christians in Pontus, Justin describes the liturgical customs of the church in Rome. Justin lived and worshiped in Rome, but he didn’t convert in Rome. He most likely converted to Christianity in Ephesus around 130 A.D. So he was familiar with the liturgical customs of both Western and Eastern Christians. It is also important to understand that Justin’s account is descriptive not prescriptive. It is not a church order (e.g. Didache, Apostolic Tradition). It is simply a description of what Christians were already doing not what Justin thought they ought to do.

https://vimeo.com/405980301

Direct download: ctc641.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob finishes reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The sixth of these sermons is on Hebrews 11:9-10, “Heavenly-Mindedness.”

 

Direct download: tsp193.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 4:35pm EDT

What was worship like in the early church? Did it differ significantly from our present practices? A letter written by a Roman official in 112 AD provides a window into these ancient Christian liturgical practices.

Pliny the Younger was appointed governor of Bithynia in 111 AD by the Emperor Trajan (98–117). Trajan knew that there was social unrest in that province, with a growing number of political factions causing divisions within the city. Among other things, he tasked Pliny with dissolving all associations or clubs in service of keeping the peace. This led him into a quandary regarding the Christians.

In one of the cities, trouble of some kind had arisen regarding the Christians, who were in several cases brought into court and accused of atheism, sexual immorality, incest, and even cannibalism. Pliny the Younger's letter offers a window into the liturgical practices of ancient Christians and how they were often misunderstood by the world.

Suggested Reading

Direct download: ctc640.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

1