Reformed Forum

Danny Olinger speaks about the life and thought of Geerhardus Vos. Richard B. Gaffin, Jr. has identified Vos as the father of Reformed biblical theology and we take the time to speak of his contribution and legacy. Rev. Olinger is General Secretary for the OPC Committee on Christian Education. He has written a tremendous biography of Vos, titled Geerhardus Vos: Reformed Biblical Theologian, Confessional Presbyterian. The book is published by Reformed Forum and available for purchase.

Direct download: ctc570.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Lane Keister speaks about features of Ezekiel 9–10 that help us understand the identity of the man of linen in the passage. Rev. Keister's article, "The Man in Linen: A New and Old Interpretation of Ezekiel 9–10" is published in issue 14 of the Confessional Presbyterian Journal (2018). Lane Keister is the pastor of Momence OPC in Momence, Illinois and a PhD student at Puritan Reformed Theological Seminary in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

https://youtu.be/Bi2eFU1fI6M

Direct download: ctc569.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this week's episode of Theology Simply Profound, the journey continues through The Pilgrim's Progress. Rob and Bob begin to discuss Stage 3 of Christian's journey from the Interpreter's House to the foot of the Cross and then along a difficult path eventually making his way to the Hill Difficulty. In this context, we come to matter concerning salvation, fear, doubt, and assurance.

Direct download: tsp139.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 5:00am EDT

We continue our #VosGroup series in pages 194–197 of Vos' book Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments to consider the biblical conception of prophetism. We discuss the Greek and pagan conceptions and their connection to contemporary modernist conceptions.

Vos has in view here a Hellenic, and not New Testament, conception of the prophet. Some would seek to understand prophet as a foreteller, which brings into view predictive prophecy—a telling of a situation in advance of the actual occurrence of the situation. However, it is not proper to take the concept in this direction only. While there is a predictive element present in much of what the prophets communicate, it is better to take them as foretellers in a local sense. This means that prophet is one who speaks an oracle from God. It is a place in time where one speaks on behalf of God.

However, the Greek terms, as it appears in a Hellenic, extra-biblical context, has a different connotation, and this is critical to grasp, that we must reject. That connotation is this: the prophet in this Greek conception is an interpreter of a fundamentally opaque, hidden utterance from god. Pythia (the name of the high priestess of the temple Apollo at Delphi), would be the interpreter of this fundamentally hidden oracle—a dark saying that needed a human interpreter in order to be rendered intelligible.

The Greek prophet does not stand in a direct relation to the deity, as in the Old Testament prophet, who spoke, by inspiration, directly from God, a word from God. Rather than being a mouth-piece of the deity, as is the case with the Nabi, the prophet in the Old Testament sense of the term, the prophet in the Greek, Hellenic sense, is an interpreter of the deity’s oracle. The oracle comes from the Deity but requires interpretation, an interpretive act, from a prophet, to render that message intelligible or clear. The prophet, in this Hellenic conception, is therefore not one who speaks the words of the deity. Rather, he is one who intercepts a supra-rational, intrinsically opaque, communication from a deity. It is precisely this conception of the prophet that Vos sees being appropriated by the liberals of his day.

https://youtu.be/t-8lw1OL4HM

Direct download: ctc568.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob continue their journey through John Bunyan's, The Pilgrim's Progress. From the Wicket Gate, Christian encounters Good Will and Interpreter whose house has many rooms. Interpreter leads Christian from one room to another explaining what Christian sees along the way in this second stage of our discussion of this classic book.

Direct download: tsp138.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 5:00am EDT

The Westminster Larger Catechism, Question and Answer 154 describes the ordinary and outwards means of grace as the Word, sacraments, and prayer. We discuss these ordinary means and how they apply to the day-to-day ministry of the local church.

https://youtu.be/WOhnDru4630

Direct download: ctc567.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, with some brief introductory remarks about reading fiction and allegory using J.R.R. Tolkien, Rob and Bob set out on a little journey of their own following Christian as he makes his way out of the City of Destruction toward the Wicket Gate with the help of Evangelist in this first stage our new discussion of John Bunyan's The Pilgrim's Progress

Direct download: tsp137.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 7:30am EDT

Glen Clary compares and contrasts the Reformation liturgies of Martin Bucer, John Calvin, and John Knox. Studying each of these helps us to understand the significance of worship reformed according to Scripture and focuses our attention upon worship in our present day.

Further Reading

https://youtu.be/BO_ir9r7q1Q

Direct download: ctc566.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

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