Reformed Forum

We turn to pp. 238– of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the Old Testament prophets and their understanding of the nature and attributes of God. Vos affirms that God is Spirit. This brings into view not that God is immaterial per se, as Vo

Direct download: ctc658.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob discuss living in this present evil age while living life in the Spirit. How does a Christian live in the midst of the chaos and the confusion, the virus and the violence? Is God sovereign over the affair

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Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 3:00pm EDT

Glen Clary speaks about the biblical basis and covenantal context of the call to worship and benediction. These elements of worship are rooted in Christ's work on behalf of his covenant people.

In the call to worship, God calls his people to have covenant communion with him in his heavenly temple. He calls us to enter his house—to draw near to him—to have communion with him.

The benediction is the bestowal of the covenant blessing by the successful probationer. Had Adam obeyed, he would have received for himself and for all his posterity the covenant blessing. The covenant blessing would be given to those whom he represented in the covenant of works on the basis of his obedience. Now, Christ as redeemer and mediator of the covenant, the obedient federal head (successful probationer) receives and bestows the blessings of the covenant.

Direct download: ctc657.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob reads J. I. Packer's (1926-2020) well known "Introductory Essay" to John Owen's The Death of Death in the Death of Christ as a tribute to this great Anglican theologian.

Direct download: tsp204.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 4:00am EDT

In this episode, we discuss a new online course wherein Dr. Lane G. Tipton teaches a thorough introduction to the theology and innovative apologetic method of Cornelius Van Til (1895–1987), a pioneer in a distinctly Reformed approach to defending the faith.

This course investigates the context, structure, and significance of Van Til’s theology and apologetics. It is designed to introduce students to the main influences and fundamental concerns of Van Til’s theological approach to apologetics. Topics include a general introduction, Trinity, image of God, covenant, revelation, worldview, antithesis, common grace, and idealism. Special attention is given to the programmatic deep structures of Van Til’s thought, distinguishing his views from Roman Catholicism, Barth, and Evangelical approaches to theology and apologetics.

This is Christ the Center episode 656 (https://www.reformedforum.org/ctc656)

Direct download: ctc656.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Jeremy Boothby speaks about covenant theology through the biblical-theological lens of the book of Hebrews. In so doing, he compares and contrasts 1689 Federalism and other particular baptist approaches to covenant theology with that of confessional Reformed covenant theology. Following the author of the epistle to the Hebrews, Boothby gets to the heart of the difference between particular baptists and Reformed paedobaptists.

The matter hinges on the present life-setting of the New Covenant Church in the wilderness. The author of Hebrews compares the church, which is presently in the New Covenant, to the first generation of Israelites in the wilderness. They were on their pilgrimage and had not yet entered their promised rest. As such, there was a real possibility of apostasy from the covenant. Likewise, the New Covenant Church has not yet entered the New Heavens and New Earth, to which earthly Canaan pointed. The author encourages covenant members to strive to enter their rest, not to fall away as they follow their forerunner and heavenly high priest, Jesus Christ.

Rev. Boothby is pastor of Christ Covenant OPC in Amarillo, Texas.

Direct download: ctc655.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Biblical exegetes have long discussed the relationship of justification in James to that of Paul. On the surface, James 2:24 appears even to contradict many of the key Pauline passages that speak clearly of justification as occurring by grace alone through faith alone in Jesus Christ alone and not by works of the law. In this episode, we discuss the different uses of the words "justification" and "justify" in James, specifically, and in the Bible, generally.

Direct download: ctc654.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues a reading of Geerhardus Vos's 1903 book, The Teaching of Jesus Concerning the Kingdom of God and the Church. In chapter 4, endeavors to test two opposing views about the kingdom of God to determine whic

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Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 4:00am EDT

We turn to pp. 235–238 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the Old Testament prophets and varying views of monotheism.

Direct download: ctc653.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues a reading of Geerhardus Vos's 1903 book, The Teaching of Jesus Concerning the Kingdom of God and the Church. In chapter 3, Vos discusses the nature of "kingdom" as well as the the difference between the difference between the usage of “kingdom of God” and “kingdom of heaven.” 

Direct download: tsp202.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 4:00am EDT

We discuss the doctrine of the covenant of works, including its biblical basis as well as common objections to it. The Reformed tradition has spoken of the relationship between God and Adam as a covenantal relationship. Without the covenant of works, we cannot rightly understand man’s relationship to God in the garden. Neither can we understand the gospel, for the work of our Lord Jesus Christ was a redeeming work necessitated by the Fall into sin.

This is Christ the Center episode 652 (https://www.reformedforum.org/ctc652)

Direct download: ctc652.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man reflecting on the disciples expectations of the kingdom of God and the change that takes place in them, especially as we see

Direct download: tsp201.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 9:07pm EDT

William Reddinger speaks about strands of resistance theory in the American Revolution, considering Lockean, Continental, and Anglo interpretations of Romans 13. Dr. Reddinger has authored “The American Revolution, Romans 13, and the Anglo Tradition of Reformed Protestant Resistance Theory” in the Summer 2016 issue of American Political Thought.

Some scholars argue that the theology of the American Revolution was fundamentally Lockean and largely incompatible with Christianity, a view that this article calls the Lockean view; more recently, others who advocate what this article calls the Lockean–Reformed view argue that the American Revolution was both Lockean and Reformed and that there is no incompatibility between these sources. This article critiques the Lockean–Reformed view and argues that there were two traditions of resistance theory in early Reformed Protestantism—the Continental tradition and the Anglo tradition. While these two traditions were not monolithic, the distinction is helpful in understanding how the theology of resistance during the American founding was different from the Continental tradition of resistance. It also allows one to be aware of the strengths and weaknesses both of the Lockean view and of the Lockean–Reformed view.

Dr. Reddinger is Associate Professor of Government, History, and Criminal Justice at Regent University. Prior to coming to Regent, he taught political science at Wheaton College in Illinois and at South Texas College. He received his undergraduate degree from Grove City College in Pennsylvania before completing his M.A. and Ph.D. in Political Science at Northern Illinois University, where his studies focused on the history of political philosophy and American political thought.

This is Christ the Center episode 651 (https://www.reformedforum.org/ctc651)

Direct download: ctc651.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

For the 200th episode of Theology Simply Profound, Bob begins a reading of Geerhardus Vos's 1903 book, The Teaching of Jesus Concerning the Kingdom of God and the Church. In chapter 1 and 2, Vos introduces the subject with an overview of Jesus' public min

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Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 5:00am EDT

We turn to pp. 234–235 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the nature and attributes of God as understand by the Old Testament prophets.

Direct download: ctc650.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Dr. James N. Anderson speaks about the philosophy of David Hume, one of the foremost thinkers of the Western tradition. Hume is well known for his influential system of philosophical empiricism, skepticism, and naturalism. Throughout his work, Hume developed a naturalistic science of man that examined the psychological basis of human nature.

Dr. Anderson is the Carl W. McMurray Professor of Theology and Philosophy and Academic Dean (Global and New York) of Reformed Theological Seminary. He is the author of David Hume (Great Thinkers) published by P&R Publishing.

Direct download: ctc649.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Danny Olinger and Camden Bucey discuss Graham Greene’s novel, The Power and the Glory, which raises many questions about the nature of faith, ordination, and the sacraments through the lens of Roman Catholic theology. Greene said, “The aim of the book was to oppose the power of the sacraments and the indestructibility of the Church on the one hand with, on the other, the merely temporal of an essentially Communist state” (Goodman, 88). John Updike called this novel, “Graham Greene’s masterpiece.”

Danny Olinger is General Secretary for the Committee on Christian Education of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church.

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Category:Reformed Media Review -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man by chatting about the power of darkness in this fallen world.

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Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 6:01pm EDT

Editor, teacher, and translator, Ryan M. Hurd speaks about the theology of Gisbertus Voetius. Hurd has translated a significant disputation of Voetius’ published as “Gisbertus Voetius: God’s Single, Absolutely Simple Essence” in The Confessional Presbyterian Journal (Volume 15, 2019).

Gisbertus Voetius (1589–1676) was a Dutch theologian born in Heusden, Netherlands, and educated at Leiden. He became a professor of theology at the University of Utrecht and wrote several significant works, including Politica ecclesiastica (3 volumes, published 1663–1676) and Selectae disputationes (theologicae) (5 volumes, published 1648–1669).

In his treatment, Voetius mediates between two of the major Medieval schools of thought—Thomistic and Scotistic. Hurd writes,

Yet the early modern period saw the rise of the Socinians and Vorstians, and this was to the dismay of all orthodox regardless of their communion. The emergence of this heterodox movement met with immediate response that would last until the eclipse of Reformed orthodoxy in the darkness of the modern age. In our own context today, we observe similarly that among the Reformed there are likewise those who uphold orthodoxy and affirm divine simplicity, and likewise those who have emerged and put themselves against it. As a historical testimony, Voetius’s disputation underlines several points to both sides.

Watch the episode on Youtube: https://youtu.be/AirFwWi4P8Y

Direct download: ctc648.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man by chatting about Israel and how God used the nation in the development of the Kingdom of God in the coming of the Messiah.

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Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 3:47pm EDT

Dr. Gregg Allison and Dr. Carl Trueman speak about the theology of Benedict XVI, pope emeritus of the Roman Catholic Church. Allison’s article, “Faith, Hope, and Love” and Trueman’s article, “Is the Pope (Roman) Catholic?,” are published in The Theology of Benedict XVI: A Protestant Appreciation edited by Tim Perry and published by Lexham Press.

Dr. Allison is Professor of Christian Theology at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky. He is the author or co-author of several books, including Roman Catholic Theology and Practice: An Evangelical Assessment and The Unfinished Reformation: What Unites and Divides Catholics and Protestants after 500 Years. He appeared on Christ the Center episodes 363 and 461.

Dr. Trueman is Professor of Biblical and Religious Studies at Grove City College in Grove City, Pennsylvania. He hosts the Mortification of Spin podcast with Aimee Byrd and Todd Pruitt. He is also the author of several books, including The Creedal Imperative and Luther on the Christian Life. Dr. Trueman has joined us many times before.

Watch the episode on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtoWuQf_1tU

Direct download: ctc647.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 2:00pm EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob wanted to pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man with a consideration of Abraham and how God used him in the development of the Kingdom of God in the coming of the

Direct download: tsp197.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 12:53pm EDT

We turn to page 234 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the understanding of monotheism which the biblical prophets possessed. On pages 206–211 of the book, Vos dealt with the modernist conception of the issue, adding a footnote that his positive treatment would be saved for later. Now we arrive at that later portion. As we begin to address this new section, we revisit some of the ground we covered in Vos Group #55, while expanding that material.

On pages 206–211, Vos gives us the key conception of the modernist critics:

The prophets, from Amos and Hosea onwards, are credited with the discovery and establishment of the great truth of ethical monotheism, in which the distinctive and permanent value of Old Testament religion is to be found.

To explain this as crisply as possible, Vos is saying that a particular ethical conception of Jehovah gives rise to the monotheism of the later prophets in the 8th century. It is a monotheism of a particular kind–a monotheism of a specific variety. There is a concrete, historical, situated, ethical dilemma that forges an ethical conception of Jehovah that otherwise would not be formed.

In contrast, Vos emphasizes that the prophets are God-centered. They are religious—meaning they find their delight in spiritual (Spirit-wrought) communion with God. The ethical aspect of monotheism is itself subservient to the glory of God and delight in fellowship with God.

The “prophetic orientation” does not view God as a means to an end, but rather delighting in God himself, as he has revealed himself as sovereign Judge and condescended Lord and Savior of his covenant people. The prophets delight in the God they proclaim and do not re-conceive him as a means to an end other than the glory of God himself as the chief end and delight of his people.

Direct download: ctc646.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob wanted to pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man with a consideration of Noah and the Flood.

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Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 9:06am EDT

James Duguid speaks about the doctrine of divine simplicity and its roots in the Old Testament. While the pages of the Old Testament are not typically the first place one would go to build the case for this orthodox doctrine, Duguid demonstrates how the uniqueness of the biblical account establishes a foundation for understanding the Lord who reveals himself through it.

Duguid is the author of "Divine Simplicity, the Ancient Near East, and the Old Testament" in The Lord Is One: Reclaiming Divine Simplicity edited by Joseph Minisch and Onsi A. Kamel and published by The Davenant Press.

https://vimeo.com/412501709

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Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Danny Olinger speaks about the theology of Graham Greene, regarded by many as one of the leading English novelists of the twentieth century. Combining literary acclaim with widespread popularity, Greene acquired a reputation early in his lifetime as a major writer of novels so-called "Catholic novels," as well as political and espionage thrillers. Twice, he was shortlisted for the Nobel Prize for Literature. In his works, Greene explored the ambivalent moral and political issues of the modern world, often through a Catholic perspective.

Rev. Olinger is General Secretary for the Committee on Christian Education of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church. He is the author of Geerhardus Vos: Reformed Biblical Theology, Confessional Presbyterian.

https://vimeo.com/411537457

Direct download: ctc644.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Joel Fick shows us how important it is to bring various passages of Scripture to bear upon one another, particularly where one may fill in the gap for the other. In Exodus 2 we learn how Christ is not a picture of Moses, but rather Moses is a picture of Christ.

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Category:Proclaiming Christ -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob wanted to pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man with a consideration of the preaching ministry of Enoch and how that ministry relates to the the kingdom of God. However, we were sidetracked more than once to talk about the current COVID-19 pandemic, our response to it...yeah, lot's of rabbit trails.

Direct download: tsp195.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 7:45am EDT

After having created Adam in his image and placing him in the Garden of Eden, God entered into a covenant with him (Gen. 2:16–17). In Westminster Confession of Faith 7.1, the divines wrote,

The distance between God and the creature is so great, that although reasonable creatures do owe obedience unto him as their Creator, yet they could never have any fruition of him as their blessedness and reward, but by some voluntary condescension on God's part, which he hath been pleased to express by way of covenant.

There are several important things to note in this passage. First, upon creation and prior to the establishment of the covenant, Adam already knew God and owed him obedience merely from the fact that he was created in God's image. God did not owe Adam anything, and Adam could in no way place God into his debt. Second, the type of fruition that the covenant affords is that of God as "blessedness and reward." Adam already owed God personal, perfect, exact and entire obedience, though God voluntarily condescended to establish the covenant of works by which Adam could consummately come to know God in glory. In other words, he could ascend God's holy hill (Psalm 24) through the gratuitous means God provided.

Westminster Confession of Faith 7.1 is not describing covenant as the means by which God ontologically or metaphysically condescends to creation. God does not assume new properties, attributes, or characteristics to do so. Neither does the confession speak of the covenant as the means by which Adam comes to know God generally—as if Adam would not even know that God existed apart from a covenant. The covenant is the means by which he may come to know God specifically as his blessedness and reward.

https://vimeo.com/410742856

Direct download: ctc643.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Mark Winder shows us how in the story of Isaac which parallels that of Abraham, there is a theological point being made: from a human perspective there is one crisis after another. But from the divine perspective, there is no salvation outside of God. Only his hand will triumph. We will also see how Abraham's obedience is a type of the obedience of Christ.

Direct download: pc083.mp3
Category:Proclaiming Christ -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In this episode, we continue our discussion of Justin Martyr's account of ancient Christian worship, focusing this time on the Lord's Supper (eucharist) and Lord's Day worship.

Justin Martyr wrote an early account of ancient Christian worship. It was written by a believer for an unbeliever. He does not assume that his intended reader—the Emperor Antoninus Pius (138–161)—knows anything about Christian worship. Second, while Pliny describes the worship practices of the Christians in Pontus, Justin describes the liturgical customs of the church in Rome. Justin lived and worshiped in Rome, but he didn’t convert in Rome. He most likely converted to Christianity in Ephesus around 130 A.D. So he was familiar with the liturgical customs of both Western and Eastern Christians. Third, Justin’s account is descriptive not prescriptive. It’s not a church order (e.g. Didache, Apostolic Tradition). It is simply a description of what Christians were already doing not what Justin thought they ought to do.

https://vimeo.com/408626530

Direct download: ctc642.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In Episode 82, Jim Cassidy gives us a primer on Covenant Theology. As Israel, shaped by the law, becomes an analogy of Adam as Adam is in covenant with God in the garden, a pattern is seen between Adam and Israel. If Adam disobeys, he is exiled from the Garden, as is also the case with Israel. God, however, is the covenant keeper, providing redemption for his people in doing what they are unable to do.

Direct download: pc082.mp3
Category:Proclaiming Christ -- posted at: 11:41am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob pick up their discussion of the Kingdom of God and the Four-fold Estate of Man with a consideration of the kingdom, man, and creation.

Direct download: tsp194.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 11:38am EDT

In his first apology (ca. 150–155 A.D.), Justin Martyr wrote an early account of ancient Christian worship, describing ancient practices regarding the sacraments and Lord's Day worship. It was written to an unbeliever, and therefore Justin does not assume that his intended reader—the Emperor Antoninus Pius (138–161)—knows anything about Christian worship. Moreover, while Pliny describes the worship practices of the Christians in Pontus, Justin describes the liturgical customs of the church in Rome. Justin lived and worshiped in Rome, but he didn’t convert in Rome. He most likely converted to Christianity in Ephesus around 130 A.D. So he was familiar with the liturgical customs of both Western and Eastern Christians. It is also important to understand that Justin’s account is descriptive not prescriptive. It is not a church order (e.g. Didache, Apostolic Tradition). It is simply a description of what Christians were already doing not what Justin thought they ought to do.

https://vimeo.com/405980301

Direct download: ctc641.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob finishes reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The sixth of these sermons is on Hebrews 11:9-10, “Heavenly-Mindedness.”

 

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Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 4:35pm EDT

What was worship like in the early church? Did it differ significantly from our present practices? A letter written by a Roman official in 112 AD provides a window into these ancient Christian liturgical practices.

Pliny the Younger was appointed governor of Bithynia in 111 AD by the Emperor Trajan (98–117). Trajan knew that there was social unrest in that province, with a growing number of political factions causing divisions within the city. Among other things, he tasked Pliny with dissolving all associations or clubs in service of keeping the peace. This led him into a quandary regarding the Christians.

In one of the cities, trouble of some kind had arisen regarding the Christians, who were in several cases brought into court and accused of atheism, sexual immorality, incest, and even cannibalism. Pliny the Younger's letter offers a window into the liturgical practices of ancient Christians and how they were often misunderstood by the world.

Suggested Reading

Direct download: ctc640.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The fifth of these sermons is on 2 Corinthians 3:18, “The More Excellent Way.”

Direct download: tsp192.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 12:13pm EDT

In 1894, B. B. Warfield published an article in which he compared the views of the Westminster divines and the Reformers on the mode of inspiration. According to Warfield, the Reformers argued for a mode of concursus while the Protestant Scholastics argued for dictation. Dr. Jeff Stivason analyzes this characterization, speaking to Warfield's historical context and his understanding of progressive orthodoxy.

Jeff Stivason is pastor of Grace Reformed Presbyterian Church (RPCNA) in Gibsonia, Pennsylvania and professor-elect at Reformed Presbyterian Theological Seminary in Pittsburgh. His article, "Is Warfield's Claim True that Calvin is Better than Westminster on Inspiration?" is available in the Westminster Theological Journal Vol. 81, No. 2 (Fall 2019), pp. 279–293.

https://vimeo.com/398346913

Direct download: ctc639.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The third of these sermons is on Luke 19:10, “Seeking and Saving the Lost.”

Direct download: tsp191.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 6:41pm EDT

In this special quarantine episode, we discuss the theological issues and lessons learned from the initial weeks of staying at home during the global COVID-19 health crisis. Though many Christians are prevented from gathering physically to worship on the Lord's Day, the Lord has promised that his church shall never perish. While our worship practices may be irregular for a time, God has provided means by which he cares for his people.

https://vimeo.com/400106693

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Category:general -- posted at: 4:01pm EDT

James Dolezal discusses his book All That Is in God: Evangelical Theology and the Challenge of Classical Christian Theism (Reformation Heritage Books, 2017). Dr. Dolezal serves as associate professor in the school of divinity at Cairn University in Langhorne, Pennsylvania.

In this conversation, and the book that guides it, Dolezal addresses the doctrines of classical theism as well as contemporary models of theology proper, which reject, compromise, or otherwise diminish the classical formulations. Interacting with primary sources from theologians such as Bruce Ware, John Frame, and K. Scott Oliphint, Dolezal charitably offers a critique while reaffirming that all that is in God is God.

Links

https://vimeo.com/398103138

Direct download: ctc638.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob continue discussing the kingdom of God as it unfolds through the four-fold estate of man: the estate of innocence, fall, redemption, and glory. This week, the Fall.

Direct download: tsp190.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 11:50am EDT

Dr. Bryan Estelle joins us to speak about Echoes of Exodus: Tracing a Biblical Motif (IVP Academic, 2018). Israel’s exodus from Egypt is the Bible’s enduring emblem of deliverance. It is the archetypal anvil on which the scriptural language of deliverance is shaped. More than just an epic moment, the exodus shapes the telling of Israel’s and the church’s gospel. Estelle traces the motif as it unfolds throughout Scripture.

Dr. Estelle is professor of Old Testament at Westminster Seminary California in Escondido, California. He is also the author of Salvation through Judgment and Mercy: The Gospel According to Jonah. He has contributed essays to Covenant, Justification, and Pastoral Ministry: Essays by the Faculty of Westminster Seminary California and The Law Is Not of Faith: Essays on Works and Grace in the Mosaic Covenant.

https://vimeo.com/391337751

 

Direct download: ctc637.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

We turn to pages 230–233 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the mode by which the Lord delivers his message to the prophet. Man is made in the image of God, which means he has a special capacity to commune with God. Vos marvels at the way in which divine speech is transmitted to those made in his image. God's word is communicated in servant form without evacuating the message of any of its divine characteristics, such as inerrancy or infallibility. The Holy Spirit works in the prophet in such a way as to inspire and superintend the entire activity of the prophet—whether in speech or inscripturation.

https://vimeo.com/395785857

Direct download: ctc636.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Dr. S. M. Baugh joins us to speak about his book, The Majesty on High: An Introduction to the Kingdom of God in the New Testament. Beginning with a definition of the kingdom of God based on the new creation, Baugh introduces the reader to the kingdom and its foundational issues.

Dr. Baugh is professor of New Testament at Westminster Seminary California in Escondido, California. He is also the author of Ephesians: Evangelical Exegetical Commentary (EEC).

https://vimeo.com/391096097

Direct download: ctc635.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The second of these sermons is on Matthew 5:6, “Hungering and Thirsting After Righteousness.”

Direct download: tsp189.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

Dr. A. Craig Troxel speaks about With All Your Heart: Orienting Your Mind, Desires, and Will toward Christ (Crossway, 2020). Whereas contemporary culture identifies the "heart" with feelings and emotions, Craig Troxel speaks about the range of uses of the word "heart" in the Bible. The heart knows, desires, and chooses. This fuller conception of "heart" helps us understand our battle with sin and the redemption that has been wrought by Jesus Christ.

Dr. Troxel is professor of practical theology at Westminster Seminary California. He previously served as pastor of Bethel Orthodox Presbyterian Church in Wheaton, Illinois and Calvary Presbyterian Church (OPC) in Glenside, Pennsylvania.

https://vimeo.com/390561082

Direct download: ctc634.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob begin a new series discussing the kingdom of God as it unfolds through the four-fold estate of man: the estate of innocence, fall, redemption, and glory.

Direct download: tsp188.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 5:42pm EDT

David VanDrunen speaks about his forthcoming book, Politics After Christendom (Zondervan Academic), reflecting upon the status and responsibilities of Christians in their contemporary pluralistic political communities. Dr. VanDrunen presents a biblical-theological model of political engagement and exploring themes such as race, religious liberty, justice, authority, and civil resistance.

David VanDrunen is Robert B. Strimple Professor of Systematic Theology and Christian Ethics at Westminster Seminary California. He is the author and editor of several books, including Aquinas Among the Protestants, God’s Glory Alone: The Majestic Heart of Christian Faith and Life, Natural Law and the Two Kingdoms: A Study in the Development of Reformed Social Thought, and Divine Covenants and Moral Order: A Biblical Theology of Natural Law.

https://vimeo.com/389569968

Direct download: ctc633.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob continues reading from the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The fourth of these sermons is on John 20:16, “Rabboni!”

Direct download: tsp187.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 1:00am EDT

We take a brief break from our regular schedule in Geerhardus Vos's book, Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments, to discuss Vos's sermon "Rabboni," on John 20:16. This sermon is found in Grace & Glory, a collection of Vos's sermons preached at the chapel of Princeton Seminary.

John 20:1–18 (ESV)

Now on the first day of the week Mary Magdalene came to the tomb early, while it was still dark, and saw that the stone had been taken away from the tomb. So she ran and went to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one whom Jesus loved, and said to them, “They have taken the Lord out of the tomb, and we do not know where they have laid him.” So Peter went out with the other disciple, and they were going toward the tomb. Both of them were running together, but the other disciple outran Peter and reached the tomb first. And stooping to look in, he saw the linen cloths lying there, but he did not go in. Then Simon Peter came, following him, and went into the tomb. He saw the linen cloths lying there, and the face cloth, which had been on Jesus’ head, not lying with the linen cloths but folded up in a place by itself. Then the other disciple, who had reached the tomb first, also went in, and he saw and believed; for as yet they did not understand the Scripture, that he must rise from the dead. 10 Then the disciples went back to their homes. 

11 But Mary stood weeping outside the tomb, and as she wept she stooped to look into the tomb. 12 And she saw two angels in white, sitting where the body of Jesus had lain, one at the head and one at the feet. 13 They said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping?” She said to them, “They have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid him.” 14 Having said this, she turned around and saw Jesus standing, but she did not know that it was Jesus. 15 Jesus said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you seeking?” Supposing him to be the gardener, she said to him, “Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him, and I will take him away.” 16 Jesus said to her, “Mary.” She turned and said to him in Aramaic, “Rabboni!” (which means Teacher). 17 Jesus said to her, “Do not cling to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father; but go to my brothers and say to them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’ ” 18 Mary Magdalene went and announced to the disciples, “I have seen the Lord”—and that he had said these things to her. 

https://vimeo.com/389834594

Direct download: ctc632.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Dr. Jordan J. Ballor, senior research fellow and director of publishing for the Acton Institute, joins us to speak about Abraham Kuyper's public theology. Dr. Ballor is a general editor of Abraham Kuyper's Collected Works on Public Theology published by Lexham Press. Kuyper was something of a polymath/renaissance man. Along with being an influential theologian and also a journalist, he served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands between 1901 and 1905. He established the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands, which upon its foundation became the second largest Reformed denomination in the country behind the state-supported Dutch Reformed Church.

Jordan J. Ballor (Dr. theol., University of Zurich; PhD, Calvin Theological Seminary) is a senior research fellow and director of publishing at the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion & Liberty. He is also a postdoctoral researcher in theology and economics at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam as part of the "What Good Markets Are Good For" project. 

https://vimeo.com/383799674

Direct download: ctc631.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Rob and Bob discuss the subject of holiness with portions of J. C. Ryle's classic book, Holiness: Its Nature, Hindrances, Difficulties, and Roots.

Direct download: tsp186.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 11:43am EDT

Matthew Patton speaks about his book, Basics of Hebrew Discourse: A Guide to Working with Hebrew Prose and Poetry (Zondervan Academic, 2019). Dr. Patton is pastor of Covenant Presbyterian Church (OPC) in Vandalia, Ohio.

This book, written by Matthew H. Patton, Frederic Clarke Putnam, and Miles V. Van Pelt, is a syntax resource for intermediate Hebrew students. This Basics book introduces students to the principles and exegetical benefits of discourse analysis (text linguistics) when applied to biblical Hebrew prose and poetry. Where standard Hebrew reference grammars have traditionally worked to describe the relationship between words and phrases within discrete clauses (micro syntax), discourse analysis works to describe those relationships that exist between clauses and texts (macro syntax).

This resource fills a needed gap for intermediate Hebrew students and gives them the tools to work with Hebrew syntax on the macro level. Professors and pastors working with Hebrew will also find this one-of-a-kind resource highly valuable.

While students of Hebrew will certainly gain from Patton's work, listeners will gain a deeper understanding of the Bible and tools for studying it in the English language as well.

https://vimeo.com/383794787

Direct download: ctc630.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

This week on Theology Simply Profound, Bob begins reading the 1922 edition of Grace and Glory, a collection of sermons delivered at Princeton Theological Seminary by Geerhardus Vos. The first of these sermons is on Hosea 14:8, "The Wonderful Tree."

Direct download: tsp185.mp3
Category:Theology Simply Profound -- posted at: 7:36am EDT

Carlton Wynne and Charles Williams speak about the new edition of Herman Bavinck's The Wonderful Works of God published by Westminster Seminary Press. The book was first published in English under the title, Our Reasonable Faith. The new edition is re-typeset and includes an introduction by Dr. Wynne, Bavinck's original introduction translated by Nathaniel Gray Sutanto, and helpful indices collected by Charles Williams.

Carlton Wynne is associate professor of systematic theology and apologetics at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, PA.

Charles Williams is pastor of Bethel Orthodox Presbyterian Church in Wheaton, Illinois.

https://vimeo.com/383391932

Direct download: ctc629.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

Shawn Ritenour, Professor of Economics at Grove City College, speaks about the basics of economics and the Christian principles upon which the study must be based. Dr. Ritenour is the author of Foundations of Economics: A Christian View (Wipf & Stock).

https://vimeo.com/377613306

Direct download: ctc628.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

In episode 81, Joel Fick leads us in a study of the birth of Moses. He demonstrates a model of preaching Christ not based upon merely noting a few parallels between an Old Testament character and the life of Christ, but based upon deep theological themes and direct scriptural references.

Direct download: pc081.mp3
Category:Proclaiming Christ -- posted at: 3:07pm EDT

We turn to pages 224–229 of Vos’s book, Biblical Theology, to speak about the intra-mental state of the prophet, by which Vos means to inquire into “how the soul felt and reacted under the things shown within the vision” (p. 224).

Far too much attention has been given to what is represented by the Greek term ecstasis. The term served first as a translation of the Hebrew tardemah (cf. Gen. 2:21 with Adam and Genesis 15:12 with Abram). In Adam’s case, there is no visionary state. In Abram’s case, there is such a vision (expound the theology of the theophany). But tardemah does not throw any light on Abram’s state of mind.

Ecstasis, on the other hand, has a very definite conception in Greek consciousness that leads in the direction of error. That conception is that of “insanity or mania” and was applied to the oracular process—the process of receiving visions and the resultant state in which it put the seer-prophet. This led to a close association between the prophet and some feature of instability—some manic tendency that seems inherent to the process of receiving a vision.

Vos points us to God's inspired, inerrant, and infallible revelation in history, which does not bypass the human mind or allow the recipient to escape his humanity, but elevates him to greater communion with God.

https://vimeo.com/382475171

 

Direct download: ctc627.mp3
Category:Christ the Center -- posted at: 12:00am EDT

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